Juicy Links. And Kindleporn.

The links section to the right is currently in progress. As soon as I get the time I’m going to be adding more: more people I know and love, more literary sites, more good stuff.

In the meantime, here’s a few interesting snippets for you to peruse.

This article about Kindleporn just throws up so many weird questions. Does the design of the Kindle facilitate easy one-handed operation? Are there now authors out there who are packaging their erotica into Kindle-page sized chunks? How should a Kindle be cleaned? The mind boggles.

Then there’s this: Robert Downey Jr. Postpones Candid Memoir. S’up Bob? Got creatively blocked, did you? Was your memoir so unbelievably candid that you were afraid of what your family and friends might think? Or was it just too much of a literary challenge? You should have called me, dude! I could have helped you with those issues. I do that kind of thing all the time!

Finally, literary tattoos. Try not to read the comments at the end from all those uptight and morally indignant Telegraph readers, just look at the pictures.

I do have a tattoo, and it does have words in it, but it’s not a literary quote. And that’s all I’m going to say about it. If I were to get a literary tattoo, though, it might be this quote from Thomas Mann, which is currently one of my favorites:

A writer is somebody for whom writing is more difficult than it is for other people.

Actually, I think all writers need to have this tattooed on their bodies somewhere, because it’s so easy to forget. We think that, because it’s difficult, we must somehow be doing it wrong, and there are other writers out there who find writing easy, and they are the real writers and we are not. Mann’s quote reminds us that, in fact, the opposite is closer to the truth.

What about you? What literary tattoo would you get?

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5 responses to “Juicy Links. And Kindleporn.

  1. interesting – thanks for this

  2. It’s never gonna happen, but if I had a literary tattoo, it would be this excerpt from Hamlet’s soliloquy, bearing in mind that ‘bare bodkin’ means ‘dagger’ and is a reference to suicide – but has a slightly ironic meaning in modern English:

    For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
    The oppressor’s wrong, the proud man’s contumely,
    The pangs of dispriz’d love, the law’s delay,
    The insolence of office and the spurns
    That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
    When he himself might his quietus make
    With a bare bodkin?

  3. I’d like to get this as a tattoo:

    The brain is just the weight of God,
    For, lift them, pound for pound,
    And they will differ, if they do,
    As syllable from sound.

    -Emily Dickinson

  4. nancyrawlinson

    Love these two suggestions — thanks! Quietus now always makes me think of Children of Men — SUCH an under-viewed film. And Dickinson? Amazing. I have a course in American poetry with Alice Quinn, former poetry editor at the New Yorker, to thank for introducing me to her work. Shocking that I didn’t know it till then, but there you are. Now I’m making up for lost time.

  5. Pingback: Bookmarks about Tattoos

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